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By November 15, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

You’ll love this candle hack

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I loved this candle but sadly, after a few hours, it was unable to burn as the wax/wick had sunk with little chance of much needed oxygen around the flame to keep it alight.

I loved this candle but sadly, after a few hours, it was unable to burn as the wax/wick had sunk with little chance of much needed oxygen around the flame to keep it alight.

Wax candles in jam jars (or any other glass containers including the Yankee Candle variety) look great BUT after a few hours of burning the amount of air getting to the wick isn’t enough to keep it burning brightly. As a result your favourite candle is limp and lame if lit at all and more often than not get put away at the back of the cupboard or thrown out.

But you can restore this very, very easily! (see my earlier blog on how to recycle tea-lights too). All you need is a saucepan of boiling water and a new container, preferably one with more ‘room at the top’ to let air freely get to the wick.

To restore and revive

Place jar with solid wax in a saucepan of boiling water.

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Keep on a low heat and allow to melt.

Once the wax is fully melted, remove the wick – and put to one side to reuse in your ‘new’candle.

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With the wax now fully melted, gently lift out of the pan of water and pour into your new container. You can, if you want, introduce a new scent. Essential oils are fine but make sure whatever you use is suitable for candles.

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Let it solidify, a bit and add the wick. This can be a bit fiddly as it is liable to lean over to the side. As the wax is solidifying keep topping it up with with more liquid wax. This prevents the middle around the wick from sinking.

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Posted in: Candlemaking

About the Author:

Ruth Tott is the publisher of Home Farmer Magazine, and together with her husband, Paul Melnyczuk, Editor,is founder of the company. But her background is far removed having specialised in Costume History with a Post-Grad diploma in Museum Studies to boot. A far cry from looking after chickens, growing veg and making bread!

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